Viking 44 Open Virtual Tour | Marlin Magazine

Marlin fans get an exclusive look at the new sport-fisher thanks to the 360-degree camera:

The next sport-fishing boat receiving Marlin‘s virtual-tour look is Viking’s 44 Open. Use the 360-degree camera and experience this sport-fisher beyond still pictures. You can also watch Marlin‘s video review of the Viking 44 Open

 

Cockpit

The 44 Open has a huge 119-square-foot cockpit that’s just a few steps away from the command bridge deck. A comfortable mezzanine is the perfect spot to watch the spread, with storage below and a drink box in the step, just like the larger Vikings. Add a rocket launcher or small fighting chair and she’s ready to fish against any boat in the world.

Helm Station

The command bridge has a centerline helm station with pod in either teak or fiberglass. Single-lever engine controls and a polished stainless wheel look great, and there’s space for a bank of 3 17-inch multi-function displays. Switches for ship systems and the mics for the VHF radios are to starboard, protected in a separate compartment.

Engine Room


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A conventional drive system with a pair of MAN I6 800 CRM diesels fits nicely in the engine room. These engines, rated at 800 hp each, are matched to Veem wheels and produce a 30-knot cruise speed and a top end of 34.5 to 35 knots.

Galley


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With a beam of 16 feet, 4 inches, the 44 Open has a spacious salon highlighted by the easy-to-care-fo Amtico flooring and a 28-inch flat-screen television. The galley has Corian countertops, a recessed sink and electric cooktop with microwave/convection oven, plus under-counter drawer-style refrigeration.

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Warning: Hurricane-Damaged Boats Soon Hitting the Used Boat Market

Buyer beware. BoatUS wants anyone looking to buy a used boat in 2018 to be aware of the “storm-damaged lemons” that are likely lurking among perfectly good pre-owned boats.

More than 63,000 boats were damaged in Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. Many will be repaired and have years of life left on the water, but other could be hiding major problems.

BoatUS, the nation’s biggest recreational boat owners’ association, is urging buyers to get a prepurchase survey (known as a Condition and Value survey).

“It’s not that you don’t want to buy a boat that’s been repaired, but you should have full knowledge of the repairs and know they were done correctly. It’s a transparency issue that will help you negotiate a fair price,” said BoatUS Consumer Affairs Director Charles Fort.

BoatUS offers eight tips to help you spot a boat that might have been badly damaged in a storm:

  1. Trace the history. When a car is totaled, the title is branded as salvaged or rebuilt, and buyers know up front that there was major damage at some point in the car’s history. But only a few states brand salvaged boats – Florida and Texas do not – and some states don’t require titles for boats. Anyone wishing to obscure a boat’s history need only cross state lines to avoid detection, which can be a tipoff. Look for recent gaps in the boat’s ownership, which may mean that it was at an auction or in a repair yard for a long time.
  2. Look for recent hull repairs. Especially on older boats, matching gelcoat is very difficult. Mismatched colors around a repaired area are often a giveaway and may signal nothing more than filler under the gelcoat, rather than a proper fiberglass repair.
  3. Look for new repairs or sealant at the hull-to-deck joint. Boats that bang against a dock during a storm often suffer damage there.
  4. Evidence of sinking. Check for consistent corrosion on interior hardware, such as rust on all hinges and drawer pulls. You might be able to spot an interior waterline inside a locker or an area hidden behind an interior structure.
  5. Corrosion in the electrical system. Corrosion on electrical items, such as lamps, connectors and behind breaker panels might mean the boat sank recently. Does the boat have all new electronics? Why?
  6. Look for evidence of major interior repairs. Fresh paint or gelcoat work on the inside of the hull and engine room is usually obvious. All new cushions and curtains may be a tipoff, too.
  7. Look for fresh paint on the engine. It may be covering exterior rust as well as interior damage.
  8. Ask the seller. In some states, a seller isn’t required to disclose if a boat was badly damaged unless you ask. If the seller hems and haws, keep looking.

Click here to learn more about marine surveys.

Orginal Article: Warning: Hurricane-Damaged Boats Soon Hitting the Used Boat Market

Unprecedented demand’ causes Yamaha to delay engine shipments

In light of “unprecedented demand,” Yamaha Motor Corp. is asking its counterparts in Japan to focus on reallocating products to the United States so the company can fill orders.

Specifically, Yamaha said that due to “a perfect storm of challenges” it is unable to meet demand for the 2.8-liter, 4.2-liter V6 and 5.3-liter V8 outboards — as well as some Yamaha rigging items — in the time frame the company had originally hoped, in part because its manufacturing operations were in transition.

“It is unprecedented demand, and we simply cannot meet the demands for shipping our product,” Martin Peters, Yamaha Marine Group communications and government relations senior manager, told Trade Only Today. “We are doing our best.”

Yamaha Marine Group president Ben Speciale sent letters to dealers and OEMs acknowledging it was unable to meet its target ship dates and apologizing for delays.

“We are experiencing the perfect storm of challenges for supplying outboards at this higher demand,” said the letter to dealers, which Peters sent to Trade Only. “The marketplace has many years of pent-up demand for larger boats and the outboard motors that power them. As the economy and mood have improved this year, demand for our premium products increased more than we had anticipated.

“This increase in demand has occurred while our manufacturing operations are in transition. The transition was designed to accommodate new products and increased longer-term demand.”

Understanding that its availability to promise dates is “less than stable,” Yamaha is bringing down target ship dates to regain stability. “We will do everything we can to bring the system back up by Dec. 15,” Speciale wrote, adding in bold: “We will continue to ship product during this time.”

The company declined to be more specific about the type of transition the manufacturing operations were in, saying that some of what it was doing was proprietary.

“There’s tremendous demand in the entire industry right now, particularly for those things that go into larger boats,” Peters said.

Yamaha engines come from Japan, but its propellers — which Trade Only learned were also difficult to procure — are manufactured by Precision Propellers Industries in Indianapolis.

“Since we purchased PPI in 2008, output has doubled,” Speciale told Trade Only in an email. “We have increased output of propellers every year. Output is up 20 percent this year, and we plan to grow it next year.”

 

See Article: Unprecedented demand’ causes Yamaha to delay engine shipments REAGAN HAYNES2 HOURS AGO

Dream Fishing Destinations and Trips: Marlin Magazine

Q: What is your dream sport-fishing destination:

Four boatbuilders’ wish-list trips

Staff

Jim Turner

Release Boatworks

Egg Harbor, New Jersey

Courtesy Jim Turner

One of my favorite destinations has always been Guatemala. The sheer number of billfish there always made it an easy decision. Plus I love old boats, so it was a place we could fish on Merritts and Ryboviches in calm seas. I would have loved to fish Cabo Blanco, Peru, in the 1950s and ’60s when the giant black marlin were being caught. Papua New Guinea is another dream trip. I have a customer who bought a boat from us there who wants us to visit. It’s more than just the actual fishing: That trip would be an adventure.

Donnie Caison

Caison Yachts

Wilmington, North Carolina

Courtesy Donnie Caison

I’ve been fortunate to fish in a lot of great locations, but one of my favorites was Kona, Hawaii, fishing with Capt. Kevin Nakamaru on Northern Lights. It wasn’t because of the great fishing but rather the amazing camaraderie on the docks. It’s such a great community of fishermen there. His mate at the time, Matt Bowman, is now a captain in Madeira, which is one of the places on my list to fish soon. But I’d really like to get back to Kona at some point too. Every trip has dream potential if you plan ahead and then just let yourself get into it.

Dominick LaCombe

American Custom Yachts

Stuart, Florida

Courtesy Dominick LaCombe

When you’re young, you dream of building the ultimate fishing machine and hitting all the great hot spots. Working with the Chouest family, we started fishing on the East Coast and in the Caribbean on the 58- and 63-foot Freedom boats. Then we built a 65 and fished Bermuda, the Cape Verde Islands and Brazil. As the dreams continued to grow, we towed the 80-foot Patriot through the South Pacific, fishing places like Tonga, Bora Bora and Nuku Hiva. I’m blessed to be fishing and building boats with my family. My dream sport-fishing destination? Wherever the next adventuring sportsmen may find it; if we’re lucky, maybe it will be us.

Tim Winters

Winter Custom Yachts

Apex, North Carolina

Courtesy Tim Winters

My favorite has to be the seamounts off Costa Rica — the blue marlin fishing there is just incredible. When you’re seeing 15 or more blues a day, you’re able to fine-tune your approach and try different things rather than getting in a rut. When we’re blue marlin fishing in North Carolina, we’re using lures — plug and chug — but in Costa Rica, we’re ­pitch-baiting fish on the teasers, and it’s a whole lot more exciting. It’s interesting to see how long a fish will stay in the spread too. We’re building two boats for the Pacific, so I’m looking forward to spending more time there.

Tags: Internationalbest billfish destinationsBest Billfish Destinations

More information:

https://www.marlinmag.com/dream-fishing-destinations?dom=flipboard&src=syn&%3Fads=off