Beach-driving may be easier at Cape Hatteras very soon

Bill in Congress would force NPS to roll

The famous “Point” at Buxton on Hatteras island may see more anglers fishing if Congress passes legislation sponsored by Rep. Walter Jones Jr., Sen. Richard Burr and Sen. Kay Hagan.
Outer Banks anglers and beach visitors could see a relaxation of the National Park Service’s beach-access rules at Cape Hatteras National Seashore by September or October, just in time for fall fishing season.
This change in the way the NPS manages parts of the national seashore was initiated by Rep. Walter Jones Jr., a congressman who represents eastern North Carolina. He’s been beating on Congress’s door since 2009, attempting to get bills passed that would roll back the effects of a federal judge’s 2008 decision that favored lawsuits by The Audubon Society and Defenders of Wildlife.

Jones was joined by Sen. Richard Burr and Sen. Kay Hagan, who helped craft a compromise rewrite (Senate Bill 486) that unanimously advanced out of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Twelve Democrats and 10 Republicans voted for the bill.

“The vote in the House (of Representatives) is assured (to approve a similar bill), while we’ll have to wait, probably until September or October, before the (full) Senate takes up the bill,” said Jim Keene of Nags Head, former president of the N.C. Beach Buggy Association. “Right now we’re on D.C. time, but we had a unanimous vote in the committee and support of the chairman.”

The two activist groups sued the NPS in 2008 while engaged in negotiated rule-making with other beach-user groups, including the Outer Banks Preservation Association, N.C. Dune Buggy Association, Cape Hatteras Anglers Club, local villages and businesses. The environmental activists charged that Off Road Vehicles driven for decades at CAHA beaches threatened or endangered some threatened sea birds and endangered turtles.

Their opponents, since merged to form the Cape Hatteras Access Preservation Alliance (CHAPA), pointed out none of the sea birds, including piping plovers, were on endangered species lists, and that most sea turtles nesting on OBX beaches are either plentiful or threatened, not endangered. Most of all they noted the strict rules approved by the judge had hurt local economies, which depend on spring and fall anglers visits, at the seven villages inside the seashore.

Keene said the Senate rewrite, while not containing everything CHAPA wanted, nonetheless contains many positive changes.

“The best thing is, the Park Service will have to negotiate and review (vehicle free areas) in size and location,” Keene said. “They’re just killing us, and many had no justification. (The NPS) also will have to consult with state of North Carolina on non-endangered species.

“They have more beaches shut down with colonial water birds and oystercatchers than (piping) plovers. The Park Service said they were birds of concern in North Carolina, but the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission wrote a letter and said these birds required no special attention. (The WRC) said it had them on the concern list just to watch and follow them. There were no special regulations at state parks (for water birds), but the NPS wrote that into (CAHA) rules.”

The new legislation also would ask anglers to do everything possible to avoid and bypass turtles and their nests.

Keene said the bill would require the Park Service to report back to the Senate at the end of 12 months and give an accounting of actual changes made.

“(The NPS) can’t just say they’ll do something and ignore it,” Keene said.

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Coast Guard rescues man after Ahi capsizes boat

Anthony Wichman of Kauai has quite a fishing tale to tell! The 54-year-old Koloa resident was rescued Friday after a huge Ahi capsized his boat about 10 miles southwest of Port Allen. Coast Guard Sector Honolulu received a distress call at 7:41 a.m., from Wichman’s spouse notifying watchstanders that her husband’s 14-foot Livingston boat was capsized south of Port Allen.

Wichman was fishing in the area when he hooked a 230 lb. Ahi that subsequently capsized his boat.

When his boat capsized, his leg was caught in the fishing line and he was dragged underwater. After freeing himself, he was able to get on top of the hull and call his wife for help.

Sector Honolulu was able to establish communication with Wichman via cell phone and launched a 47-foot Motor Life Boat crew from Coast Guard Station Kauai and an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point to the scene.

The Dolphin crew arrived on scene and found Wichman sitting on the hull of his partially submerged vessel. A Coast Guard rescue swimmer was lowered to the water and hoisted Wichman into the helicopter. Sector Honolulu and Station Kauai coordinated with Lihue Airport and local emergency medical personnel to arrange for medical transport to Wilcox Memorial Hospital.

The MLB crew stayed on scene with the capsized vessel until Jordon Ornellas and Abraham Apilado, friends of Wichman arrived on scene with a vessel to help salvage his boat. While assessing the situation to determine if they could right the capsized vessel, Ornellas and Apilado realized that the Ahi was still hooked on the fishing line attached the vessel. They were able to reel in the Ahi, right the vessel and take it in tow back to Port Allen.

“This rescue is a perfect example of why mariners must be sure they have good safety equipment and reliable communications before heading out on the water,” said Lt. Jessica Mickelson, Sector Honolulu’s Public Affairs Officer. “Thankfully Mr. Wichman was still able to use his cell phone after capsizing and entering the water. Sector Honolulu was able to work in conjunction with 911 dispatch to get a GPS position of the capsized vessel from Mr. Wichman’s cell phone enabling Coast Guard rescue crews to arrive on scene at the exact location of distress instead of having to conduct a search. At the end of the day, we couldn’t have asked for a better rescue. Mr. Wichman was delivered safely to shore with minimal injuries and he and his friends will have quite the indisputable fish tale to tell.”

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Coast Guard rescues man after Ahi capsizes boat

Anthony Wichman of Kauai has quite a fishing tale to tell! The 54-year-old Koloa resident was rescued Friday after a huge Ahi capsized his boat about 10 miles southwest of Port Allen. Coast Guard Sector Honolulu received a distress call at 7:41 a.m., from Wichman’s spouse notifying watchstanders that her husband’s 14-foot Livingston boat was capsized south of Port Allen.

Wichman was fishing in the area when he hooked a 230 lb. Ahi that subsequently capsized his boat.

When his boat capsized, his leg was caught in the fishing line and he was dragged underwater. After freeing himself, he was able to get on top of the hull and call his wife for help.

Sector Honolulu was able to establish communication with Wichman via cell phone and launched a 47-foot Motor Life Boat crew from Coast Guard Station Kauai and an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point to the scene.

The Dolphin crew arrived on scene and found Wichman sitting on the hull of his partially submerged vessel. A Coast Guard rescue swimmer was lowered to the water and hoisted Wichman into the helicopter. Sector Honolulu and Station Kauai coordinated with Lihue Airport and local emergency medical personnel to arrange for medical transport to Wilcox Memorial Hospital.

The MLB crew stayed on scene with the capsized vessel until Jordon Ornellas and Abraham Apilado, friends of Wichman arrived on scene with a vessel to help salvage his boat. While assessing the situation to determine if they could right the capsized vessel, Ornellas and Apilado realized that the Ahi was still hooked on the fishing line attached the vessel. They were able to reel in the Ahi, right the vessel and take it in tow back to Port Allen.

“This rescue is a perfect example of why mariners must be sure they have good safety equipment and reliable communications before heading out on the water,” said Lt. Jessica Mickelson, Sector Honolulu’s Public Affairs Officer. “Thankfully Mr. Wichman was still able to use his cell phone after capsizing and entering the water. Sector Honolulu was able to work in conjunction with 911 dispatch to get a GPS position of the capsized vessel from Mr. Wichman’s cell phone enabling Coast Guard rescue crews to arrive on scene at the exact location of distress instead of having to conduct a search. At the end of the day, we couldn’t have asked for a better rescue. Mr. Wichman was delivered safely to shore with minimal injuries and he and his friends will have quite the indisputable fish tale to tell.”

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Tour our in-stock Sabre 38 Salon Express and learn more about all of the new models in the Sabre Yachts lineup.

New Model Showcase
Monday July 15, 2013
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Sabre 38
Sabre YachtsOur in stock 38 Sabre Salon Express offers the latest in design and naval architecture.  Her exterior profile showcases a “downeast” and is built in the Maine tradition: beautiful, strong, steady, reliable and seaworthy. Technology abounds with her resin infused laminates and pod drive propulsion which provides more area for interior space as well as good fuel economy.
Sabre 38
Sabre 38
The interior showcases an open design suited to a day’s outing with family and friends. The  main salon hosts a large, U-shaped settee which surrounds an inlaid table. The forward end of the settee can be oriented forward to provide a comfortable forward facing seat while underway.  To starboard and aft of the Stidd helm seat is a long cherry cabinet housing an LED television on a lift.
Sabre 38
Sabre 38
The forward end of the salon opens to the galley below. Just forward you’ll find access to the owners cabin with a walk around berth and ample storage as well as a private head with stall shower. You’ll find the master TV cleverly hidden in a bulkhead and when not in use, will disappear into the galley cabinetry, opening up the stateroom thru to the galley. Below the helm deck and to port, an L-sette converts to a second sleeping accommodation.
Dimensions

  • LOA: 38
  • Beam: 13′ 4″
  • Displacement: 21,500 lbs.
  • Draft: 3′ 4″
  • Fuel: 300 gal.
  • Water: 100 gal.
Engine

  • Make: Volvo
  • Model: D4 with IPS
  • Horsepower: 300 hp
  • Configuration: Twin
  • Fuel Type: Diesel
  • I/O Configuration: Inboard
I’m Interested in the Sabre 38!

Other New Models from Sabre

Sabre 54 FB

Sabre 54 Flybridge Sedan

The 54 Flybridge Sedan ranks among the quietest in her class due to her resin infused PVC foam core, which makes her lightweight and strong, and her honeycomb coring that can be found throughout all deck structures, bulkheads, and cabin soles. Her powerful CAT ACERT C15 865 hp engines easily and quickly bring her on plane.

Sabre 54

Sabre 54 Salon Express

All aspects and details of this magnificent yacht are executed with boat building skills passed down by generations of Maine craftsmen and women. By including in her design and systems the latest equipment and technology, Sabre Yachts has created the ultimate cruising yacht.

Sabre 48

Sabre 48 Salon Express

ON ORDER!

Our 48 Sabre Salon Express delivers this Fall and is built with Cummins QSC 8.3 @ 600 hp Zeus Pods, a flag blue hull, cherry interior cabinetry, and a crew quarters with head. She provides a comfortable 30 knot cruise and will attain more than 34 knots at WOT.

Sabre 42FB

Sabre 42 Flybridge Sedan

A better all-around boating experience: That’s what the new Sabre 42 Flybridge Sedan has to offer. With her quiet ride, fuel-efficient engines, and maneuverable drive system she is sure to leave an impression on even the most seasoned boaters.

Sabre 42

Sabre 42 Salon Express

A whole new day: Quieter, more fuel efficient, more maneuverable. More of the things that make your boating experience exceptional.

New Model Brands
Personal Boat Shopper
New Yachts
Why Buy

Not For Standing Room Only: The New Viking 92 Convertible Sportfish

Not For Standing Room Only
VIking 92 Enclosed Bridge Convertible

Nothing short of amazing, the new Viking 92 Enclosed Bridge Convertible will enjoy its world premiere at the October 2014 Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show. Although its debut is nearly a year-and-a half away, the excitement about this new model was thunderous during the recently completed annual Viking Yacht Dealer Meeting, which took place at the Golden Nugget in Atlantic City.

One look at this magnificent 238 square-foot cockpit says it all. From the flanking teak planked staircases to the upper mezzanine seating and spacious after deck to a host of additional features and amenities including built-in live wells, freezers, tackle and gear stowage, and engine room access, this cockpit is a work of art.

VIking 92 Enclosed Bridge Convertible

Power & Motor Yacht Tests The Grand Banks 55 Eastbay FB

Grand Banks 55 Eastbay FB

By George Sass Jr.

THE INFO
  • Builder: Grand Banks
  • Model: Grand Banks 55 Eastbay FB
  • Year: 2013
  • Boat Type: Downeast
  • LOA: 55’1″
  • Beam: 16’4″
  • Draft: 5’2″
  • Standard Power: 2/885-mhp Cat C18 ACERT diesels
  • Base Price: Upon request

Photography by Billy Black

Ties That Bind

The Grand Banks 55 Eastbay FB follows the pedigree born nearly 20 years ago, and in doing so gives one family their perfect boat.

It’s 7:33 am on a Saturday. The familiar echoes and smells of early morning cruise preparations flow through the open cabin doors. Dishes clatter in the sink. Fridges open and close as kids are corralled towards the saloon table for a breakfast that comes a little earlier than usual for youngsters on a July morning. Soft voices stream from the saloon across the cockpit and disperse into the waking Block Island anchorage. The aroma of freshly brewed coffee subdues the odor of newly varnished teak in the interior. New boat owner Josh extends a sweeping wave from the saloon door, directing us to pull along his starboard side where pristine Maine Point fender covers await our rather battered Glacier Bay.

Josh casually walks around, tidying up the deck of Lenox—a brand-spanking-new Grand Banks 55 Eastbay FB—like he’s completed this routine a hundred times before, rehearsing the departure in his head, analyzing the gusty winds and current. In fact, it’s not even a week since he and his wife have taken delivery of Lenox from Boatworks Yacht Sales.

I secure the chase boat alongside with my friend and photographer Billy Black and jump onboard thanks to an extended arm from Josh. The chilled dew greeting my bare feet on the golden teak deck just feels right. This—this whole scene—is why we go cruising. And the 55 is certainly a yacht intended to leave the dock.

“We looked at several other boats, including larger ones,” says Josh, who asked that his last name, as well as his wife’s and children’s names, be withheld here. “Yet in the end we decided we still wanted a boat that we could run ourselves,” he says, motioning toward his young family.

Their previous boat was a Grand Banks 42 Europa, which they cruised for ten years in New England. Josh and his wife refer to themselves as “fortunate,” having both enjoyed successful careers in hedge funds and investment banking. They possess the means to buy a far larger yacht with all the trappings and even crew. Yet after spending a day with the family and witnessing how they boat together as such a tight nucleus, already fully connected to Lenox, it’s abundantly clear why they selected this course.

Introductions were made in the saloon as the kids finished up breakfast before our early morning run to Nantucket. Billy began photographing the deck details, while I examined the flawlessly finished teak interior.

“Look here, these guys thought of everything,” Josh says, pointing to a drawer holding flatware and cutlery. I heard this sentiment throughout the day—an appreciation for the details executed by Grand Banks and a trust for this august builder. For full disclosure, I worked for Grand Banks in the mid ’90s and we always tried to accommodate custom requests, no matter how difficult. Yet often times the end result was a far departure from the standard boat and just didn’t work. Yet, Josh and his wife only specified two changes to the layout on Lenox, trusting instead that the layout designed by Grand Banks would work.

“We removed the overhead cabinet meant to go here.” Josh’s wife points to the area over the after galley counter. “We didn’t want to obstruct the view.” Great idea, I thought, there’s plenty of stowage elsewhere. “And take a look down here in our son’s stateroom.” Behind the sliding teak doors on the port side was a huge double berth versus the standard twin awthartships arrangement. Opening hatches and ports and comfortable bedding created a plush haven for young kids or adults. Other than these two items, Lenox’s interior reflects the accommodations plan you see on page 40. A galley-down arrangement is also offered.

Up on deck, Lenox felt as solid as a slab of slate. I was surrounded by shipshape details that shouted out to remind me that this Eastbay was not just a pretty face. Not some gussied-up debutante designed and built to twist upon a mooring outside of  a yacht club eliciting praise of passersby. Nope, she is meant to go to sea. Whether it be a cruise way Down East, up the Inside Passage to Alaska, or a Caribbean jaunt to the Virgin Islands, as the owners of Lenox intend.

The deck hardware was beefy and well finished. A stainless safety rail lined the wide walkaround decks, perched upon a teak caprail serving as a bulwark to keep feet firmly placed on the optional teak decks. A Lofrans windlass with remote switches on the bridge and the lower helm station serves the plow anchor secured to the bow platform with stainless roller. A side door offers easy transition between the lower helm and deck. However, I offer a note of caution. With this forward opening setup always make sure the door is tightly secured by its latch. The fingers of my right hand were crushed a decade ago when the wind caught a pilothouse door that was set up the same way. It came slamming back on my hand as I gripped the doorframe while docking the boat, and man did it hurt.

The forward deckhouse setup reminds me that Grand Banks’s production director Bruce Livingston built a whole bunch of sailboats during his career, including the iconic Little Harbor series for noted yachtsman Ted Hood. An exquisitely crafted set of teak Dorade boxes are designed to keep the air flowing into the accommodations below, and the set of teak grabrails provide an extra element of safety, especially for kids. The owners specified the extra teak options, including the transom. “I wanted to add a few similar touches similar to my 42 Europa,” says Josh.

Lenox is the first flybridge version of the 55 Eastbay. It’s rare that I find that the addition of a bridge improves the aesthetic of a boat originally designed as an express. Yet, that’s exactly the case with the 55. When the model was first introduced as an express only, I wanted to like it more than I did. The interior worked well, it was finished in typical Grand Banks fashion, but the deckhouse proportions and profile were not as sweet as you would expect. Especially compared to the 54 Eastbay Saloon Express—with just about the most finely tuned proportions of any Eastbay. (That is to say until the new 50 hits the water this fall. She’s a stunner. See her on the opposite page.)

But the bridge version of the 55 corrects any aesthetic imperfections, in my opinion. The bridge draws the eye skyward and the mass of the large housetop is concealed. Of course, the Grand Banks-built hardtop could be brought down slightly unless you plan on hosting a few NBA players, and I would consider adding an overhead hatch or two abaft the helm for increased ventilation.

Like her Eastbay siblings, the 55 rides on top of a C. Raymond Hunt Associates-designed deep-V. And boy what a ride! Like all Hunt hulls, there is a sharp entry forward and this V-shape is carried all the way aft to the transom. Take a look at the running shot on pages 38 and 39, and notice how the spray strips and hard chine forward lift the 55 and knock down the water. It’s hard to tell from these shots, but it was a blustery ride on Nantucket Sound that morning. Even with a stacked chop and full gear and load Lenox achieved a top speed of 34 knots. I didn’t even touch the tabs. At 1950 rpm, or about 70-percent load, we galloped along at 26 knots. Take the throttles back to about a 56-percent load, and the speed settled into a very comfortable and economical 20 knots. With the short fetch behind us there was zero tendency to bow steer, and she banked into turns like a little wakeboarding boat. In fact, I subjected Josh and his family to a series of turns and maneuvers after we’d departed Block Island, but I couldn’t help myself. If you’re in the market for this type of boat, don’t even bother starting with an interior walkthrough. Just take this baby for a ride. Even at displacement speeds Lenox handled extremely well, partly due to the amount of hull that V places in the water at these speeds. Although in my opinion having a trolling valve as standard on the big 1,150-horsepower Caterpillar C18 ACERTS would be the right play.

Engine-room access is through the cockpit and there are also soft patches above in the saloon sole for major service. Livingston is hyper-focused on serviceability and access on all his boats, and he met his own goals on the 55.

We pulled into the crowded Nantucket Boat Basin, where Josh easily manuevered through the tight marina aided by bow and stern thrusters and darn good helm skills. When he was about to pivot into our slip I heard a shout from a nearby boat in broken English. “How fast does dat boat go?” I instantly recognized the gentlemen standing beside the questioner in the cockpit of a nearby surface-drive-equipped boat as the founder and chairman of one of the largest and most successful boatbuilders in the world. He was in town for a dealer rendezvous.

“Thirty-four knots,” Josh answers, while effortlessly backing down.

“Nah, there’s no way!” shot back the naysayer.

Josh shrugged his shoulders with the self-satisfied smirk of those who know they’re right but could care less about proving it to others. Although I’m guessing there was a bit of pride as well.

I placed my test gear in my backpack and meandered down the docks toward the taxi stand at the bottom of Main Street. I stopped to take one last gaze at Lenox. It was tough not to. She tugged at her lines surrounded by superyachts and boats of all kinds, her engine-room blowers still buzzing. On deck Josh, his wife, and kids all were cleaning their new yacht with care and devotion. Lenox had indeed found a good home, and this boating family had indeed found a good boat.

http://www.powerandmotoryacht.com/boat-tests/grand-banks-55-eastbay-fb